Curriculum

Course Content Year 9, 10 & 11 – Key Stage 4

In Years 9, 10 and 11, all pupils are required to follow a core programme of subjects. These include GCSEs in English Language, English Literature, Mathematics and Science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics or Combined Science). Within the core, pupils will also be required to study Physical Education, PSHCE and Core RE.

Most pupils at Leasowes will follow the E-Bacc route and will also choose a language (French or Spanish) and either History or Geography.

Pupils will then choose a further two options from a range of subjects.

GCSE Subjects

Mathematics

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have to work through different steps to acquire the mathematical acquisition. Year 9 will work through steps 2/3/4, Year 10 3/4/5 and Year 11 will follow steps 4/5/6.

Curriculum Content:

The curriculum contents taught in KS4 ensures all pupils are:

Fluent in fundamental of mathematics, including through varied and frequent practice with increasing complex problems over time so that pupils develop conceptual understanding and ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.

Able to reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry, conjecturing relationships and generalisations, and developing an argument, justification or proof using mathematical language.

Able to solve problems by applying their mathematics to variety of routine and non-routine problems with increased sophistication, including breaking down problems into series of simpler steps and persevering in seeking solutions.

Year 9

Number. Algebra. Ratio and rates of change. Geometry and measures. Probability and Statistics.

Year 10

Number. Algebra. Ratio and rates of change. Geometry and measures. Probability and Statistics.

Year 11

Separate SoW incorporating revision of Years 9 and 10 contents.

Assessment:

Students are assessed once per half term based on the steps they studying. Weekly homework tasks are set to consolidate and challenge further. Both written and oral based tasks are used to assess students’ progress. Students are further assessed through presentations, group and individual work.

In addition to this Year 10 students sit a full mock GCSE at the end of Year 10. Year 11 students will have gone through two sets of GCSE mocks including scores of practice papers before their final GCSE maths

Examination Board: Edexcel

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/history/gcse/history-8145/scheme-of-assessment

SMSC links:

Develop deep thinking and questioning the way in which the world works promotes the spiritual growth of our students.

Within classroom, we encourage respect, reward good behaviour. We value listening to others views and opinion on problem solving.

We encourage collaborative learning in the form of listening and learning from each other and paired discussion.

At Leasowes we demonstrate and encourage diverse techniques eg for multiplication that have derived from different ancient civilisations. – Russian / Chinese multiplication, etc.

We follow https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/mathematics-2015.html course for both higher and foundation tiers.

Useful websites:

Work and resources can be found on Doddle.

vle.mathswatch.co.uk/vle

www.mathsgenie.co.uk/

www.corbettmaths.com/

www.doddlelearn.co.uk/

www.kerboodle.com/

English Language

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 4x55minute lessons per week.

Curriculum Content:

The English Language qualification is comprised of two equally-balanced papers, which both include a reading and a writing section. Each section counts for 25% of the total marks for the GCSE. The reading sources act as stimulus for writing tasks, providing students with a clear route through each paper.

Paper 1, Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing, looks at how writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to engage the interest of readers. Paper 2, Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives, looks at how different writers present a similar topic over time.

Year 9

Romeo and Juliet. Of Mice and Men. Poetry.

Year 10

Short Stories unit covering all English Language AOs.

English Language Paper 1. Explorations in creative reading and writing
Inference. Language analysis. Structure analysis. Evaluation. Descriptive Writing. Narrative Writing.

Year 11

English Language paper 2. Writer’s viewpoints and perspectives

Inference, Language and structure analysis, Evaluation, Comparison of non-fiction sources, Writing to explain, argue or persuade, Spoken Language presentations.

Assessment:

Each half term students will complete either a reading or writing based assessment task, which focuses on the skills required at GCSE. These include: inference, language analysis, comparison, descriptive writing and writing to argue a viewpoint.

Additionally, students complete the following Mock examinations: Paper 1 in January of Yr 10, Paper 2 in June of Yr 10, Paper 1 in November Yr 11, Paper 2 in March of Yr 11.

Examination Board: AQA

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-language-8700

SMSC links:

Students study extracts from a range of different fiction and non-fiction texts from 19th, 20th and 21st century. These include texts exploring topics such as mental health, the environment, prison systems, education and health.

Students use a range of social skills within the classroom when working in pairs and in groups to prepare presentations. In addition to this students consider social trends within the texts and compare how society has changed over the course of time.

They will learn a lot about the culture of different social groups during different time periods, especially through the non-fiction texts that are studied

Useful websites:

www.bbc.com/education/examspecs/zcbchv4

www.doddlelearn.co.uk/app/login

English Literature

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 4x55minute lessons per week.

Curriculum Content:

The English Literature qualification is comprised of two papers: Paper 1, Shakespeare and the 19th Century Novel and Paper 2, Modern texts and Poetry. Paper 1 has 2 sections, each worth 20% of the GCSE qualification whilst Paper 2 has 3 sections, each worth 20% of the GCSE qualification. The specification is fully co-teachable with GCSE English Language. Students will greatly benefit from the transferable skills learnt across the two subjects.

Year 9

Romeo and Juliet. Of Mice and Men. Poetry.

Year 10

Modern Text. Either: An Inspector Calls, Blood Brothers. Power and conflict Poetry from the GCSE Anthology.

Year 11

19th Century Novel. Either: Frankenstein. A Christmas Carol. Shakespeare. Either. Romeo and Juliet. Macbeth. Unseen Poetry.

Assessment:

Each half term students will complete either a reading or writing based assessment task, which focuses on the skills required at GCSE. These include: inference, language analysis, comparison, descriptive writing and writing to argue a viewpoint.

Additionally, students complete the following Mock examinations: 19th Century Novel and An Inspector Calls in November Yr 11, Shakespeare, Poetry Anthology and Unseen Poetry in March of Yr 11.

Examination Board: AQA

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/english/gcse/english-literature-8702

SMSC links:

Students explore the importance of religion in society when studying texts from a historical time period, such as Shakespeare, Shelley and Dickens.

Many texts studied include their own morals, which are discussed as part of the schemes of work, such as attitudes towards, and treatment of, the working classes in Edwardian society.

Students use a range of social skills within the classroom when working in pairs and in groups to prepare presentations. In addition to this students consider social trends within the texts and how society has changed over the course of time.

They will learn a lot about the culture of different social groups during different time periods, especially through the poetry examples studied.

Useful websites:

www.bbc.com/education/examspecs/zcbchv4

www.doddlelearn.co.uk/app/login

Physical Education Core

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 2x 55min lessons in PE per week.

Curriculum Content:

Year 9

Performance, Competition and Knowledge Pathway. Recreation to encourage healthy active lifestyles Pathway. Lots of different sports dependant on groups.

Year 10

Performance, Competition and Knowledge Pathway. Recreation to encourage healthy active lifestyles Pathway. Lots of different sports dependant on groups.

Year 11

Performance, Competition and Knowledge Pathway. Recreation to encourage healthy active lifestyles Pathway. Lots of different sports dependant on groups.

Assessment:

Core PE – At the end of each half term students will be assessed on their current activity by skill application and knowledge development.

SMSC links:

Students will develop a sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them. Students will be consistently encouraged to use their imagination and creativity in their learning, and showcase a willingness to reflect on their own and others experiences.

PE in general teaches students about code of conduct, etiquette, handshake before and after matches, applauding the opposition, fair play, unwritten rules and sportsmanship. Students will abide by the rules and regulations, gaining a good understanding of rules of sport and the importance of infringements such as penalties and red cards allow students to understand the consequences of their actions which in turn helps students apply this understanding to their own lives. The concepts of self-discipline to excel are essential. Students will be taught that the only way you can achieve in sport to a high standard is if you work hard and if you can discipline yourself to train and apply yourself.

Students in PE will use of a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with students from different religious, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. The willingness to participate in a variety of social settings, cooperating well with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively. An interest in and understanding of, the way communities and societies function at a variety of levels. Also students will develop their friendship and social mixing through involvement in inter, intra school competition and extra-curricular clubs.

The PE department will encourage a willingness to participate in sporting opportunities that will help to develop positive attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

Useful websites:

www.brianmac.demon.co.uk

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/pe

www.aahperd.org/

www.aaos.org

www.Fi.edu/biosci/heart.html

www.pelinks4u.org

www.teachpe.com

Physical Education GCSE

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils who have opted for GCSE PE will get 3x 55min lessons a week.

Curriculum Content:

COURSE CONTENT

GCSE Physical Education at Leasowes is a very popular and successful course with high pass rates. We deliver an intense and challenging course which will start in Year 9. The specification is covered by combining practical and theory based lessons.

Practical 40%
The activities that we cover include football, netball, badminton, basketball, trampolining and athletics. We also offer rock climbing. The students are given some choice in these and at the end of the course their three best marks will count towards their final grade. If a student takes part in a sport outside of school, then this could also count towards the final grade. The practical grades are awarded for personal performance and analysis of the sport. The students are able to use their favourite sport to study in depth for their analysis of performance marks. The course is 40% practical performance and 60% theoretical.

Theory 60%
Students will also look in detail at the following main areas:
Anatomy and physiology
Movement analysis
Physical training
Health, fitness and well-being
Sport psychology
Socio-cultural influences
Monitoring heart rates and training thresholds

ASSESSMENT
Two written examinations at the end of the course (60%)
3 practical performances and training programme (40%)
The theory and practical examination will be taken at the end of Year 11.

PROGRESSION
Many of our ex-students are now following sports related courses at colleges and universities. Some of the many interesting areas that it can lead to are:

Sports coaching and development
Teaching
Sports psychology
Nutrition
Analysis of sport

Assessment:

Edexcel

SMSC links:

Students will develop a sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them. Students will be consistently encouraged to use their imagination and creativity in their learning, and showcase a willingness to reflect on their own and others experiences.

PE in general teaches students about code of conduct, etiquette, handshake before and after matches, applauding the opposition, fair play, unwritten rules and sportsmanship. Students will abide by the rules and regulations, gaining a good understanding of rules of sport and the importance of infringements such as penalties and red cards allow students to understand the consequences of their actions which in turn helps students apply this understanding to their own lives. The concepts of self-discipline to excel are essential. Students will be taught that the only way you can achieve in sport to a high standard is if you work hard and if you can discipline yourself to train and apply yourself.

Students in PE will use of a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with students from different religious, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. The willingness to participate in a variety of social settings, cooperating well with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively. An interest in and understanding of, the way communities and societies function at a variety of levels. Also students will develop their friendship and social mixing through involvement in inter, intra school competition and extra-curricular clubs.

The PE department will encourage a willingness to participate in sporting opportunities that will help to develop positive attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

Useful websites:

www.brianmac.demon.co.uk

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/pe

www.aahperd.org/

www.aaos.org

www.Fi.edu/biosci/heart.html

www.pelinks4u.org

www.teachpe.com

Drama

Time Allocation:

In Years 10 and 11, pupils will have 1 x 55min and 1 double lesson in Drama per week. The students will follow the WJEC Eduqas Drama 9-1 specification.

Curriculum Content:

Year 10

Aut: Practitioners- Artaud and Berkoff, Spring: Responding to stimuli and Component 1 Mock, Summer: Component 1 exam.

Year 11

Preparation for Components 2 and 3. Component 2: Performing from a Text (These will vary depending on the ability of the groups). Component 3- Written examination based on a set text: DNA.

Assessment:

At the end of each module, pupils will be assessed on their contribution towards the assessment objectives set in the specification, in line with the Eduqas marking criteria for each component.

SMSC links:

The students will explore the methodologies of various practitioners through practical and theoretical assignments gaining an understanding of the social, historical and cultural context of the stimuli given to them. Students will be given the opportunities to explore their own opinions and justify their ideas in response to various stimuli.

The students will be expected to adopt the methodologies and style of a chosen practitioner and apply this to their practical work. This task is heavily research based and has a strong cross-curricular links.

Our students will use a range of social skills within the classroom when working with others and will be given the opportunity to experience real life theatre through external visits to the theatre.

The GCSE curriculum will provide the students with opportunities to explore artistic influences from different countries.

PSHCE

Page under construction

Art & Design

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55 min lessons each week.

Curriculum Content:

Art is taught in relation to given and chosen titles, students must meet the four criteria areas whilst investigating their stimulus. Drawing, Painting, 3D work, Printmaking, Digital Work, Mixed Media.
Analysing and researching art and artists.
Students are taught in each of these areas but may also investigate other art forms independently and apply this knowledge to their own investigations.

Year 9

Students revisit formal elements in art and develop a deeper understanding of materials. Natural Forms, Observational Skills, Use of 2D materials, Investigating 3D materials, Digital Media.

Year 10

1-work shop unit developed on a given title. The workshops will include Acrylic painting /mixed Media and printmaking.
2- extended unit on a chosen title. It is started in the spring term and completed over a 12 month period. Students are able to use their prior learning from previous years to help their development.

Year 11

Completion of the extended unit. Externally set assignment (Exam). Students respond to their chosen starting point from an externally set assignment paper relating to their subject title, evidencing coverage of all four assessment objectives. Students are Given a 12 week preparation period followed by a 10 hour controlled assessment.

Assessment:

Year 9 Students are marked at several points during the year, they are marked holistically on their skills base,use of materials ,techniques and development of ideas. Year10 and 11 – Students work is assessed holistically at several points during the year. They must produce portfolio that in total shows explicit coverage of the four assessment objectives. It must include a sustained project evidencing the journey from initial engagement to the realisation of intentions and a selection of further work Undertaken during the student’s course of study this can include workshop pieces. The exams and non-exam assessment will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.
AO1: Develop ideas through investigations, demonstrating critical understanding of sources.
AO2: Refine work by exploring ideas, selecting and experimenting with appropriate media, materials, techniques and processes.
AO3: Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions as work progresses.
AO4: Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and demonstrates understanding of visual language

Examination Board:

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/art-and-design/gcse/art-and-design…/fine-art

SMSC links:

Students are introduced to titles that incoporate spiritual, moral, social and cultural understandings these include stimulus related to art from around the world both contemporary and traditional.

Students will learn about the world around them to develop an understanding of art in context to world around them they investigate cultural art ,artists and designers and develop an understanding of why and how art is made they learn about the similarities and differences between the different art forms.

Students are given the opportunity to research and analyse art and art forms from around the world, traditional and contemporary, they give opinions on the work they study and are able to discuss their opinions and justify their thoughts and ideas. Students will discuss a number of art works including the spiritual, cultural and moral context they develop understanding relating to symbolism, why and how this is used.

Students develop their own art work where they can demonstrate their understanding of identity, religion, cultures and concepts, and are able to annotate this to support their thoughts.

Students are given opportunity work with their peers in order to create collaborative pieces and develop their ideas.

Useful websites:

Work and resources can be found on Doddle.

www.pinterest.co.uk/studentartguide/beautiful-igcse-gcse-art

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/art-and-design/gcse/art-and-design-8201-8206

www.nationalgallery.org.uk

www.tate.org.uk/art

www.npg.org.uk

DanceDanceDance

Design & Technology

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have three lessons per week.

Curriculum Content:

Pupils will use year 9 and 10 to develop their skills and knowledge of the subject in preparation for the Non Examination Assessment (50%) and final Examination (50%).

Year 9

Pupils will complete several mini projects using an iterative design approach, focusing on a range of different skills, processes and develop their knowledge. Pupils will produce e-portfolio for each unit. Pupils will use a range of Computer Aided Design software such as Autodesk, 2D Design and SketchUp. They will also use Computer Aided Manufacturing equipment including the Laser Cutter and Makerbot 3D Printer.

Pupils will have the opportunity to work on the F1 in Schools Challenge.

Year 10

In year 10, pupils will continue to work on a range of mini projects using an iterative design approach, while developing their skills and knowledge of the subject. There will also be a greater emphasis on the technical knowledge in preparation for the final examination.

On the 1st June OCR will release the contextual challenges for the NEA. Pupils will start their projects and work on them throughout year 11.

Pupils will have the opportunity to work on the F1 in Schools Challenge.

Year 11

Pupil will continue to work on their NEA project until Easter. The e-portfolio projects will be submitted to OCR for assessment.

Following the NEA, pupils will fully focus on the examination preparation.

Assessment:

Pupils will be assessed on all of their e-portfolios completed through KS4 using the OCR marking criteria. They will also complete regular mini tests to monitor their technical knowledge.

Examination Board: OCR GCSE (1-9) Design and Technology

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/gcse-design-and-technology-j310-from-2017/

SMSC links:

Spiritual

Explore creativity through product design.
Explore emotions through design development.
Reflection time to access own ideas.
Use imagination in individual work and group work.
Appreciation of beauty through discovery of materials and design.

Moral

Encourage respect for others and their work.
Work cooperatively.
Encourage respect in classroom environment.
Encourage respect for equipment.
Promote trust.
Encourage sustainability through recycling and Upcycling.

Social

Promote a sense of community.
Encourage independence and self respect.
Celebrate success with displays and exhibitions.
Encourage group/class discussion.
Promote group work and accept roles within a group.

Cultural

Appreciate how culture influences design.
Explore a range of materials and equipment used by different cultures.
Gain inspiration though visiting exhibitions.
Respect diversity of cultural values and beliefs.

Useful websites:

http://www.f1inschools.co.uk/

http://www.technologystudent.com/

https://www.sketchup.com/products/sketchup-make

https://www.autodesk.com/education/competitions-and-events/f1inschools/recommended-software

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/gcse-design-and-technology-j310-from-2017/

Food Preparation & Nutrition

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Music

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Business

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55min lessons in Business per week.

Curriculum Content:

Pupils will use year 9 to develop their skills and knowledge of the subject in preparation for starting the GCSE course in year 10.

The course is split into 2 sections:

Business 1: Business activity, marketing and people.
Business 2: Operations, finance and influences on business.

Year 9

Introduction to business, Entrepreneurs, Business activity, Competitors, Finance, Communication, Law, External influences.

Year 10

Business 1 topics. Business planning, Ownership, Aims and objectives, Stakeholders, Business growth, Market research, Market segmentation, Marketing mix, Organisational structures, Recruitment, Motivation, Training, Employment law.

Year 11

Business 2 topics. Production processes, Quality of goods and services, Customer service, Consumer law, Business location, Working with suppliers, Sources of finance, Revenue, costs, profit and loss, Break even, Cash and cash flow, Ethics, The economic climate, Globalisation.

Assessment:

This GCSE is assessed through 2 externally marked examinations, taken at the end of year 11. Each examination is worth 50% of the GCSE.

Throughout the course, students will complete mini tests and tasks using real life businesses to support and develop their understanding.

Examination Board: OCR

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse/gcse-business-j204-from-2017/

SMSC links:

Students are encouraged to explore discrimination in the workplace through the discussion of employment laws.

They will discuss and evaluate various moral issues relating to business practices, such as large multinationals and how much tax they pay, profits and ethical issues.

Students have the opportunity to exercise leadership skills and work collaboratively.

Business students consider the changes within society and how they may impact on businesses.

Useful websites:

https://businessed.co.uk/

www.bbc.co.uk/news

www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zpsvr82

www.tutor2u.net/business

Dance

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55 min lessons each week

Curriculum Content:

GCSE dance is taught in relation to 3 main areas of study: Performance, Choreography, Appreciation.

Year 9

Students will develop skills in the 3 main areas in preparation for the up and coming two year course. The year is used as a skill building year. Students will be expected to perform at external and internal performances and festivals.

Year 10

Solo performance: Students must learn how to perform as a solo dancer for approximately one minute. They will learn 4 short phrases, all of which will be studied to the upmost of accuracy to be recorded these are: breathe, flux, shift, scoop.

Choreography: Students must learn how to respond creatively to an externally set stimulus, to choreograph their own complete dance. The dance created must be either: a solo dance of a minimum of two minutes and a maximum of two and a half minutes or a group dance of a minimum of three minutes and a maximum of three and a half minutes for two to five dancers.

Year 11

Students will redo performance and choreography that was studied in year 10 implementing feedback and improve for the best possible final grade.

Appreciation: Through written communication and use of appropriate terminology, students must be able to critically analyse, interpret and evaluate their own work in performance and choreography and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of professional practice in the six set works in the GCSE Dance Anthology. Dance appreciation is assessed through a written exam of one and a half hours duration.

Assessment:

Performance and choreography

Solo performance (12 marks)
Students must be assessed on their ability to demonstrate:
physical skills and attributes safely during performance
technical skills accurately and safely during performance
expressive skills in reproducing the content of the chosen two set phrases.

Duet/trio performance (24 marks)
Students must be assessed on their ability to demonstrate:
physical skills and attributes safely during performance
technical skills accurately and safely during performance
expressive skills reflecting the choreographic intent of the duet/trio performance.

Mental skills and attributes during performance (4 marks)
Students must be assessed on their mental skills and attributes during the solo and the duet/trio performances.

Choreography (40 marks)
Students must be assessed on their ability to creatively and effectively select and use the following, as relevant to their choreographic intent:
action and dynamic content
spatial content (and relationship content where appropriate)
structuring devices and form
choreographic devices
aural setting (and performance environment where appropriate).

Written exam

This component is the written exam paper of one and a half hours, set in the summer of the year of certification. The question paper has three sections and covers the assessment objectives AO3 and AO4. The exam will be marked out of 80.

Section A
AO3 relates to the knowledge and understanding of choreographic processes and performing skills. Questions will relate to a given stimulus for students to write a response.

Section B
AO4 relates to the critical appreciation of own work. Questions will relate to students’ own experience of performance, or choreography or both from within the course.

Section C
AO4 relates to the critical appreciation of professional works and students will answer questions relating to the GCSE Dance Anthology.

Students must be able to critically analyse, evaluate and identify similarities and differences and explain and justify their own opinions with reasoning.

Examination Board: AQA

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/dance/gcse/dance-8236

SMSC links:

Courses based on this specification encourage students to:
learn to choreograph, perform and appreciate dance as an art form inform their development as creative and artistic individuals and broaden their aesthetic, social and cultural experience through a holistic engagement with dance.

GCSE specifications in dance enable students to engage as choreographers through the:
creative and imaginative response to a range of stimuli use of imagination, problem solving, creativity and the synthesis of ideas application of knowledge, skills and understanding of choreographic forms and devices communication of ideas, feelings, emotions, meanings and moods.

GCSE specifications in dance enable students to engage as performers through the:
application of knowledge, skills and understanding of performing development of physical, technical, mental and expressive skills communication of choreographic intention and artistry.

GCSE specifications in dance enable students to appreciate dance through the:
articulation of knowledge and critical reflection to inform artistic practice critical appreciation of dance in its physical, artistic, aesthetic and cultural contexts critical analysis, interpretation, evaluation and appreciation of professional dance works.

Work and resources can be found on Doddle.

Useful websites:

www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/dance/gcse/dance-8236

Combined Science

Assessment:

GCSE Combined Science is 100% externally assessed with no coursework. Every student will sit six exams at the end of Year 11.

Each paper is worth 60 marks and has a duration of 1 hour and 10 minutes. The core practical skill questions make up 15% of the marks in the exam papers. Paper 1 and 2 – Biology, Paper 3 and 4 – Chemistry, Paper 5 and 6 – Physics.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/sciences-2016.html

SMSC links:

Spiritual – The science schemes of work involve the search for meaning and purpose in natural and physical phenomena. Some topics lend themselves to taking into account different people’s faiths and values e.g. creation of the universe and evolution life.

Moral – Students are given the opportunity to realise that moral dilemmas are often involved in scientific developments. For example, organ transplants and new stem cell research.

Social – Students work together when carrying out group practical work. This provides opportunity to develop team working skills and to take responsibility. Pupils must take responsibility for their own safety during practical work. These groups are made from a variety of backgrounds.

Cultural – Science is an easy way for students to appreciate the credit which should be given to scientific discoveries of other cultures. That these discoveries which are so important to us are made all over the world.

Useful websites:

www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zp266yc

www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_a9BRQbVc0

Biology

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 8x 55 minute lessons.

Curriculum Content:

The GCSE Biology course is part of the triple science course which gains pupils three GCSEs in each of the science disciplines; biology, chemistry and physics. Many of the topics covered are similar to combined science, but they are covered in more detail in the separate science.

Year 9

Key Biological concepts
Cells and control
Genetics

Year 10

Natural Selection
Ecosystems
Homeostasis

Year 11

Exchange and Transport
Health and Disease

Assessment:

GCSE Biology is 100% externally assessed with no coursework. Every student will sit two exams at the end of Year 11.

Each paper has a weighting of 50%, worth 100 marks and has a duration of 1 hour and 45 minutes.

The core practical skill questions make up 15% of the marks in the exam papers.

Examination Board:

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/Science/2016/Specification/GCSE_Biology_Spec.pdf

SMSC links:

Spiritual – The science schemes of work involve the search for meaning and purpose in natural and physical phenomena. Some topics lend themselves to taking into account different people’s faiths and values e.g. creation of the universe and evolution life.

Moral – Students are given the opportunity to realise that moral dilemmas are often involved in scientific developments. For example, organ transplants and new stem cell research.

Social – Students work together when carrying out group practical work. This provides opportunity to develop team working skills and to take responsibility. Pupils must take responsibility for their own safety during practical work. These groups are made from a variety of backgrounds.

Cultural – Science is an easy way for students to appreciate the credit which should be given to scientific discoveries of other cultures. That these discoveries which are so important to us are made all over the world.

Students are given opportunity work with their peers in order to create collaborative pieces and develop their ideas.

Useful websites:

Work and resources can be found on Doddle.

www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zp266yc

www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_a9BRQbVc0

Physics

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 8x 55 minute lessons

Curriculum Content:

The GCSE Physics course is part of the triple science course which gains pupils three GCSEs, in each of the science disciplines; Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Although many of the topics covered are similar to combined science, there are several extension topics as seen in bold below.

Year 9

Motion and forces. Waves. Radioactivity. Uses of Radioactivity.

Year 10

Astronomy. Energy. Electricity. .

Year 11

Static electricity. Electromagnetic Induction. Magnetism. .

Assessment:

GCSE Physics is 100% externally assessed with no coursework. Every student will sit two exams at the end of Year 11.

Each paper has a weighting of 50%, worth 100 marks and has a duration of 1 hour and 45 minutes.

The core practical skill questions make up 15% of the marks in the exam papers.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/Science/2016/Specification/GCSE_Physics_Spec.pdf

SMSC links:

Spiritual – The science schemes of work involve the search for meaning and purpose in natural and physical phenomena. Some topics lend themselves to taking into account different people’s faiths and values e.g. creation of the universe and evolution life.

Moral – Students are given the opportunity to realise that moral dilemmas are often involved in scientific developments. For example, organ transplants and new stem cell research.

Social – Students work together when carrying out group practical work. This provides opportunity to develop team working skills and to take responsibility. Pupils must take responsibility for their own safety during practical work. These groups are made from a variety of backgrounds.

Cultural – Science is an easy way for students to appreciate the credit which should be given to scientific discoveries of other cultures. That these discoveries which are so important to us are made all over the world.

Useful websites:

https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zp266yc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_a9BRQbVc0

Chemistry

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 8x 55 minute lessons.

Curriculum Content:

The GCSE Chemistry course is part of the triple science course which gains pupils three GCSEs, in each of the science disciplines; biology, chemistry and physics. Although many of the topics covered are similar to combined science, there are several extension topics as seen in bold below.

Year 9

Key Chemistry Concepts, States of matter, Separation techniques.

Year 10

Uses of Metals, Transition Metals, Electrolysis, Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis, Chemical Cells and fuel cells.

Year 11

Fuels, Hydrocarbons, Polymers, Periodic Table, Rates of Reaction, Alcohols and carboxylic Acids, Nanoparticles.

Assessment:

GCSE Chemistry is 100% externally assessed with no coursework. Every student will sit two exams at the end of Year 11.

Each paper has a weighting of 50%, worth 100 marks and has a duration of 1 hour and 45 minutes. The core practical skill questions make up 15% of the marks in the exam papers.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/Science/2016/Specification/GCSE_Chemistry_Spec.pdf

SMSC links:

Spiritual – The science schemes of work involve the search for meaning and purpose in natural and physical phenomena. Some topics lend themselves to taking into account different people’s faiths and values e.g. creation of the universe and evolution life.

Moral – Students are given the opportunity to realise that moral dilemmas are often involved in scientific developments. For example, organ transplants and new stem cell research.

Social – Students work together when carrying out group practical work. This provides opportunity to develop team working skills and to take responsibility. Pupils must take responsibility for their own safety during practical work. These groups are made from a variety of backgrounds.

Cultural – Science is an easy way for students to appreciate the credit which should be given to scientific discoveries of other cultures. That these discoveries which are so important to us are made all over the world.

Useful websites:

https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zp266yc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_a9BRQbVc0

Computer Science

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55 minute per week.

Curriculum Content:

There are two parts to computer science: 1. Hands-on programming. 2. Understanding theory behind how computers and programs work.

Building on their existing skills, students will learn how to program in a professional programming language called Python. This will be taught in a practical way by developing games, apps and other useful programs.

Students will also be given an excellent understanding of computer science theory, including: How to solve problems like a computer scientist, What is happening inside a computer, How a computer can process so many different types of data, How the Internet works, Cybersecurity, Ethical, legal and environmental issues.

Year 9

Introduction to Python, Computer games programming, Binary numbers, Computer networking and the Internet, Computer hardware, Algorithms.

Year 10

Advanced Python skills, App programming, Computational thinking, Data representation, Cybersecurity, Types of computer.

Year 11

GCSE programming project, Advanced algorithms, Programming languages and software, Ethical, legal and environmental issues, Exam preparation and revision.

Assessment:

Throughout the GCSE, students will be assessed through the evaluation of programs they develop and through assessed written work in each unit.

The GCSE is assessed through two written exams, one focusing on programming and computational thinking, the other on theory.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/edexcel-gcses/computer-science-2016.html

SMSC links:

Students will learn about the impacts (both positive and negative) that computer technology has had, is having and may have on the way we live.

They will consider the responsibilities of a professional computer scientist when creating new technologies.

Discussions will take place about moral and ethical issues surrounding new technology and its impact on society.

Students will have opportunities to consider how cybersecurity and data protection is implemented in different countries around the world.

Useful websites:

www.youtube.com/craigndave

www.csnewbs.com

www.mrfraser.org

www.sololearn.com/Course/Python

www.cambridgegcsecomputing.org

www.python.org

French

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55min lessons in French per week.

Curriculum Content:

French is taught in topics and will cover 5 themes:

Identity and Culture
Local Area, Holiday and Travel
School
Future aspirations and work
International and global dimension

Pupils will be encouraged to speak spontaneously, understand literary texts and develop their translation skills.

Year 9

Friends and Family. Leisure Activities. Technology. Daily life. Shopping. Festivals and Celebrations.

Year 10

Town and countryside. Holidays. Travel. School. Jobs. Future plans.

Year 11

Our planet. Environment. Voluntary work. Worldwide events. Exam preparation. Revision techniques.

Assessment:

At the end of each module throughout Year 9-11, pupils will be assessed on their listening and reading skills plus either writing or speaking.

The GCSE is made up of four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. All skills are terminal exams sat in the summer of Year 11 and each paper is worth 25%. The speaking exam will take place with subject teachers but is marked by an external examiner.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/French/2016/specification-and-sample-assessments/Specification-Pearson-Edexcel-Level-1-Level-2-GCSE-9-1-French.pdf

SMSC links:

Pupils will learn about the world around them – especially from French-speaking countries around the world. We will learn about the similarities and differences between their own country and others.

Pupils will give opinions and justify their ideas about their own lives and those from different countries. Discussions will take place about different moral and ethical issues from around the world.

They will use a range of social skills within the classroom when working with others and will hopefully be given the opportunity to meet real French people and to experience the culture of a different country first hand.

They will learn a lot about the culture of different countries including, literature, songs, films and celebrations.

Useful websites:

www.1jour1actu.com

www.bonjourdefrance.com

www.rfi.fr

www.jde.fr

www.ados.fr

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/French/2016/specification-and-sample-assessments/Specification-Pearson-Edexcel-Level-1-Level-2-GCSE-9-1-French.pdf

Spanish

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55min lessons in Spanish per week.

Curriculum Content:

Spanish is taught in topics and will cover 5 themes:

Identity and Culture
Local Area, Holiday and Travel
School
Future aspirations and work
International and global dimension
Pupils will be encouraged to speak spontaneously, understand literary texts and develop their translation skills.

Year 9

Holidays. Travel. School. Friends and Family. Leisure Activities. Technology.

Year 10

Town and countryside. Shopping. Daily life. Festivals and Celebrations. Jobs and Future plans.

Year 11

Our planet. Environment. Voluntary work. Worldwide events. Exam preparation. Revision techniques.

Assessment:

At the end of each module throughout Year 9-11, pupils will be assessed on their listening and reading skills plus either writing or speaking.

The GCSE is made up of four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing. All skills are terminal exams sat in the summer of Year 11 and each paper is worth 25%. The speaking exam will take place with subject teachers but is marked by an external examiner.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/Spanish/2016/specification-and-sample-assessments/Specification-Pearson-Edexcel-Level-1-Level-2-GCSE-9-1-Spanish.pdf

SMSC links:

Pupils will learn about the world around them – especially from Spanish-speaking countries around the world. We will learn about the similarities and differences between their own country and others.

Pupils will give opinions and justify their ideas about their own lives and those from different countries. Discussions will take place about different moral and ethical issues from around the world.

They will use a range of social skills within the classroom when working with others and will hopefully be given the opportunity to meet real Spanish people and to experience the culture of a different country first hand.

They will learn a lot about the culture of different countries including, literature, songs, films and celebrations.

Useful websites:

https://www.veintemundos.com/en/

http://www.spanishpodcast.org/

https://albalearning.com/

http://www.podclub.ch/sendungen/a-mi-aire-sp

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/Spanish/2016/specification-and-sample-assessments/Specification-Pearson-Edexcel-Level-1-Level-2-GCSE-9-1-Spanish.pdf

Geography

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3 x 55mins lessons.

Curriculum Content:

Year 9

Natural Hazards (Tectonic and Weather). The Living World (Tropical Rainforests and Hot Deserts). Physical Landscapes in the UK (Coastal Landscapes and Rivers Landscapes).

Year 10

Urban Issues and Challenges (Rio de Janeiro and Birmingham). The Changing Economic World (Nigeria and the UK). The Challenge of Resource Management (Energy).

Year 11

Geographical Applications and Skills (Issues Evaluation and fieldwork to Leasowes River, Burnham-on-Sea and Brindley Place).

Assessment:

Lessons have practice exam questions embedded throughout. Students are assessed at the end of each unit with summary tests. Mock exam based on the course content. End of Course Exams.

Examination Board: AQA

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/gcse/geography-8035

SMSC links:

Social – How natural hazards affect the lives of ordianary people.

Moral – Students discuss various moral issues such as abortion and drug use in the Core RE course.

Spiritual – Students investigate the role of religion in medicine and how spiritual beliefs can hinder medical and technological progress.

Cultural – Students investigation of the changing economic world of Nigeria encourages them to compare experiences with people living in the UK.

Useful websites:

https://www.bbc.com/education/levels/z98jmp3

History

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3 x 55mins lessons per week.

Curriculum Content:

Year 9

Conflict and Tension in Europe (1894-1918), Health and the People.

Year 10

America, Expansion and Consolidation (1840-1895).

Year 11

Norman England.

Assessment:

Lessons have practice exam questions embedded throughout.
Students are assessed at the end of each unit with summary tests mock exam based on the course content.

End of Course Exams
Paper 1: 1 Hour 45 minutes. American and Conflict and tension
Paper 2: 1 Hour 45 minutes. Health and Norman England

Examination Board: AQA

https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/history/gcse/history-8145/scheme-of-assessment

SMSC links:

Social – How natural hazards affect the lives of ordianary people

Moral – Students discuss various moral issues such as abortion and drug use in the Core RE course.

Spiritual – Students investigate the role of religion in medicine and how spiritual beliefs can hinder medical and technological progress

Cultural – Students investigation of the changing economic world of Nigeria encourages them to compare experiences with people living in the UK

Useful websites:

https://www.bbc.com/education/levels/z98jmp3

Vocational Subjects

BTEC Enterprise

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3x 55min lessons in BTEC Enterprise per week.

Curriculum Content:

Pupils will use year 9 to develop their skills and knowledge of the subject in preparation for starting the BTEC Tech Award in year 10.

The course has 3 components:

Component 1: Exploring enterprises
Component 2: Planning for and running an enterprise
Component 3: Promotion and finance for enterprise

Year 9

Introduction to business. Entrepreneurs. Business activity. Aims and objectives. Location. Marketing. Finance.

Year 10

Enterprise. Customers. Competitors. Market research. Measuring success. External factors. Planning and pitching ideas for a micro-enterprise activity. Communication. Risk assessment. Monitoring enterprise performance.

Year 11

Promotional mix. Market segmentation. Financial statements. Profitability. Cash flow. Break even analysis. Sources of finance.

Assessment:

Components 1 and 2 are internally assessed units, where students complete a portfolio of assignments. Component 3 is an externally assessed unit, taken in year 11.

During the course, students will assessed in a number of ways through assignments, tests, presentations and tasks using real life businesses to support and develop their understanding

Examination Board: Pearson

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-tech-awards/enterprise.html

SMSC links:

Students are encouraged to explore their own feelings and meaning and reflect upon topics such as ethics, considering the actions that businesses should take. This enables students to consider other people’s aims, values and beliefs.

They investigate a wide range of businesses, from local sole traders to multinational organisations, considering the similarities and differences in how they operate. They also consider how their local community be can be affected by business closures and redundancies as well as new business opportunities.

Students consider the impact of marketing and advertising campaigns.

Students have the opportunity to work as a team and to express themselves clearly.

Useful websites:

www.bbc.co.uk/news

https://businessed.co.uk/

http://www.beebusinessbee.co.uk/

BTEC Sport

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils who have opted for BTEC Sport will get 3x 55min lessons a week.

Course Content:

The BTEC First Award in Sport is a practical, work related course. The course introduces you to the world of working in the sports industry and provides a basis to go on to a more advanced work-related qualification. Students will follow four units of work for BTEC such as:

Practical Sports Performance
Leading Sports Activities
Fitness For Sport and Exercise
Training for Personal Fitness

In regards to participation in sports there are numerous opportunities for this in activities such as football, basketball, badminton, rounders’ and many others. Unlike GCSE you will not be assessed on your practical ability across 3 sports but instead on your knowledge and leadership skills.

Assessment:

BTEC is largely coursework based with one only one unit assessed via an examination.

Progression:

The knowledge and skills gained will provide an introduction to those required for careers in sport and the health and fitness industry.

Successful completion of this qualification will enable learners to progress to Level 3 qualifications in related subjects and open many doors to local colleges and 6th forms.

This award is now equivalent to a GCSE.

Examination Board: Edexcel

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/btec-tech-awards/enterprise.html

SMSC links:

Students will develop a sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them. Students will be consistently encouraged to use their imagination and creativity in their learning, and showcase a willingness to reflect on their own and others experiences.

PE in general teaches students about code of conduct, etiquette, handshake before and after matches, applauding the opposition, fair play, unwritten rules and sportsmanship. Students will abide by the rules and regulations, gaining a good understanding of rules of sport and the importance of infringements such as penalties and red cards allow students to understand the consequences of their actions which in turn helps students apply this understanding to their own lives. The concepts of self-discipline to excel are essential. Students will be taught that the only way you can achieve in sport to a high standard is if you work hard and if you can discipline yourself to train and apply yourself.

Students in PE will use of a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with students from different religious, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. The willingness to participate in a variety of social settings, cooperating well with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively. An interest in and understanding of, the way communities and societies function at a variety of levels. Also students will develop their friendship and social mixing through involvement in inter, intra school competition and extra-curricular clubs.

The PE department will encourage a willingness to participate in sporting opportunities that will help to develop positive attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities.

Useful websites:

www.brianmac.demon.co.uk

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/pe

www.aahperd.org/

www.aaos.org

www.Fi.edu/biosci/heart.html

www.pelinks4u.org

www.teachpe.com

iMedia

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3 x 55 minute lessons each week.

Curriculum Content:

Year 9 will provide the foundations for the work to be completed in Years 10 and11, they will be creative topics which generate skills using software and evaluative skills. The work undertaken will include using pre-production skills.

Students will undertake 4 units of study in Year 10 and 11, 2 of which will be chosen from the available units based upon the strengths of the group identified in work completed in Year 9. There are 2 compulsory units: one externally assessed exam on Pre-production materials and one internally assessed unit on Digital Graphics.

Students will take 2 optional units from:

Creating 2D and 3D digital characters
Storytelling with a comic strip
Creating a multipage website
Creating a digital animation
Creating interactive multimedia products
Creating a digital sound sequence
Creating a digital video sequence
Digital photography
Designing a game concept
Developing digital games

Assessment:

Students will be assessed in Year 9 after each topic has been covered and through regular progress checks. In years 10 and 11 students will take regular mini quizzes. Course units will be assessed on completion and students informed of marks gained.

The final unit will be externally assessed by a 1hr 15 minute written exam.

Year 9

Web development. App creation. Computers through time. Pre-production materials. Image editing and creation. Games development.

Year 10

Pre-production material recap and revision. Completion of first assessed unit: Digital Graphics. Start of second assessed unit.

Year 11

Completion of second assessed unit. Completion of third assessed unit. Exam preparation and revision.

Progression:

The knowledge and skills gained will provide an introduction to those required for careers in sport and the health and fitness industry.

Successful completion of this qualification will enable learners to progress to Level 3 qualifications in related subjects and open many doors to local colleges and 6th forms.

This award is now equivalent to a GCSE.

Examination Board: OCR Cambridge Nationals in Creative iMedia

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/cambridge-nationals/creative-imedia-level-1-2-award-certificate-j807-j817/

SMSC links:

Pupils will learn about the world around them and how to ensure that they stay safe and are able to communicate effectively in the digital world. Creating resources suitable for all effectively.

Pupils will give opinions and justify their ideas about their own lives and those from different countries on how technology is used in a positive way. Discussions will take place about different moral and ethical issues of using digital technologies.

They will use a range of social skills within the classroom when working with others and will hopefully be given the opportunity to use a multitude of pieces of software effectively.

They will learn to consider different cultures and the use of technology in those countries, some with less use and others who are at the forefront of this use of technology. They will understand how these cultures use the technology to provide appropriate media.

Useful websites:

http://www.ictteacher.co.uk/ocr-imedia

Level 2 Food

Page under construction

Level 2 Child Development

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have three lessons per week.

Curriculum Content: KS4 – Child Development Cambridge Nationals Level 1/2 Certificate

Year 9

Unit RO18

Step by step teacher led activities with end of unit tests

Learning Outcome 1: Understand reproduction and the roles and responsibilities of parenthood.
Learning Outcome 2: Understand antenatal care and preparation for birth.
Learning Outcome 3: Understand postnatal checks, postnatal provision and conditions for development.
Learning Outcome 4: Understand how to recognise, manage and prevent childhood illnesses.
Learning Outcome 5: Know about child safety.

Year 10

Unit R019

Step by step teacher led activities to enable students to produce independent outcomes.

Task 1:

“You have been asked to help a nursery to select key equipment for two rooms”

Room 1; Babies 0 to 12 months Room 2; Children aged 1 to 5 years Students will present the key equipment required for each room and consider at least three factors when choosing equipment for each room;

• travelling equipment
• feeding equipment
• sleeping equipment
• clothing and footwear.

Task 2:

Nutritional requirements for children from birth to five years.
“You have been asked to produce resources to be used with new nursery staff, showing the nutritional requirements for children up to 5 years.”

the nutritional requirements for children in each stage:

0-6 months
6-12 months
1-5 years
the macro and micro nutrients
the functions and sources of nutrients
other dietary needs (fibre and water)
Eatwell plate/guide and making healthy choices.

Task 3:

Practical feeding solutions for children from birth to five years.

The nursery has asked you to use the knowledge gained from Task 2 to plan and carry out ONE of the tasks below:

Task A:

Investigate feeding options for breast feeding mums planning to return to work at the supermarket and use the on-site nursery. Compare;

-breast feeding
-bottle feeding
-a combination of the two

You should also make a bottle feed suitable for a 0 to 6 month old baby. You must:

-consider nutrition
-list the resources required
-make a bottle feed following appropriate hygiene practices
-produce an information sheet to include:
-nutritional analysis
-a comparison of all three feeding options (breast, bottle and combination feeding)
-an evaluation

Task B:

Investigate baby foods suitable for 9 month old babies in the nursery;

-Select two similar commercially available baby foods
-produce a homemade version for comparison.

You must:

-consider nutrition and two other factors in your investigation
-list the resources required
-make your baby food following appropriate hygiene practices
-present your findings to include:
-nutritional analysis
-a comparison of all three baby foods
-an evaluation

Task C:

Investigate the factors that the nursery needs to consider when providing meals.
Plan and make a two course meal for four year old children at the nursery.

You must:

-consider nutrition and two other factors in your investigation
-list the resources required
-make your two course meal following appropriate hygiene practices

-present your findings to include:

-nutritional analysis
-a comparison of your meal with the nutritional requirements
-an evaluation

Year 11

Unit RO20

Step by step teacher led activities to enable students to produce independent outcomes.

Research and produce fact sheets to help volunteers helping in a crèche to have a thorough understanding of:

Task 1:

-physical development
-intellectual development
-social development norms of children from birth to five years developmental stages of children.

Task 2:

Benefits of learning through play • the types of play
the benefits of learning through play

Task 3:

Plan two different play activities for a chosen developmental area for a child from birth to five years.

Show how the activities can be chosen, planned and carried out with a child.

Carry out an initial observation of an age appropriate child (i.e. not a young baby)

-collect information which will inform your choice and planning.
-Plan two different play activities that you can carry out with the child.
-The play activities must be for one developmental area.

-Produce plans for the two play activities which must include:

the developmental area chosen
aims
types of activities chosen
reasons for choice
safety considerations
timescale
resources
methods of observation
methods of recording.

Task 4:

Carrying out different play activities for a chosen developmental area with a child from birth to five years.

Carry out the activities you have planned in Task 3.

You must:

introduce the activities to the child carry out the two play activities
observe and record the activities
compare the child with the expected developmental norms for the area chosen
evaluate the two play activities
make suggestions for improvements
draw conclusions.

Assessment:

Pupils will be assessed on all of their Independent Units of work completed through KS4 using the OCR marking criteria.

They will also complete regular end of unit tests to monitor their specialist knowledge.

Examination Board: Child Development Cambridge Nationals Level 1/2 Certificate

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-education-and-skills/cambridge-nationals-child-development-level-1-2-j818/?qualtype_key=cambridge-nationals/

SMSC links:

Spiritual

how child development methods, principles and values support children. Spiritual well-being can be enhanced through, for example, the activities offered to develop creative abilities and respect can be shown for individuals’ beliefs and how these impact on their lives.

Moral

offering the opportunities to reflect on the values of care and to consider some of the dilemmas faced when dealing with children from all walks of life.

Ethical

learning about rights of children and understanding the values of care, to promote protection and fair and equal treatment.

Social

how child development and care can affect the quality of life experienced and how individuals’ requirements are met.

Cultural

helping learners appreciate that child development contributes to the development of our culture and to social cohesion. How learners need to show cultural awareness of children when communicating and interacting with them. Legislative

the main aspects of legislation relating to child development and care: Data Protection Act, Equality Act, Health and Safety and other legislation that applies to the sector

Economic

learning about making informed decisions about the provision for children (e.g. meals, toys, development activities) and the different types of child care settings and support services that are available for use taking into consideration the implications for availability and cost

Useful websites:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-education-and-skills/cambridge-nationals-child-development-level-1-2-j818/?qualtype_key=cambridge-nationals/

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/where-can-i-give-birth/

RSL Music

Time Allocation:

In Years 9, 10 and 11, pupils will have 3 x 55 minutes lessons per week.

Curriculum Content:

Year 9

Rehearsal Skills
Performance Skills
Putting on a Performance for a live audience

Year 10

1950s Music
1960s Music
1970s Music
1980s Music
1990s Music
2000s Music

Year 11

Rehearsal Unit assessment
Listening To Music Unit Assessment
Performing Skills assessment

Assessment:

Students will have regular opportunities to perform in classroom concerts and at more formal occasions. They will be able to evaluate their own work and that of other students. The following units are internally assessed: ‘Listening To Music’, ‘Rehearsal Skills’. The ‘Music Performance’ unit is externally assessed.

Progression:

The knowledge and skills gained will provide an introduction to those required for careers in sport and the health and fitness industry.

Successful completion of this qualification will enable learners to progress to Level 3 qualifications in related subjects and open many doors to local colleges and 6th forms.

This award is now equivalent to a GCSE.

Examination Board: RSL

https://www.rslawards.com/vocational/

SMSC links:

Students will learn about the music around them and the impact it has on everyday life. They will look at similarities and differences between a variety of musical styles.
Discussions will take place about different moral and ethical issues from around the world.
They will use a range of social skills within the classroom when working with others and will learn to communicate effectively and perform as an ensemble.
They will learn about the culture of different countries through music.